Plants for Birds: Growing Healthy Communities for Birds and People Together by John Rowden

START DATE | TIME
Monday, January 27, 2020
2:00pm
END DATE | TIME
Monday, January 27, 2020
4:00pm
LOCATION
Event Address

311 Peruvian Avenue
Palm Beach, FL 33480
United States

Garden Class

Open to the Public

Reservations Required

Audubon’s bird-friendly communities conservation strategy is guided by the principle of improving communities all over the country by providing birds with food, shelter, safe passage, and places to raise their young. Native plants provide resources that support birds in each of those areas, and research is demonstrating that even small patches of habitat planted with natives – down to the yard and neighborhood scale – can benefit birds. In 2016, Audubon introduced the nationwide Plants for Birds program that provides resources and support, with the goal of helping people put native plants in the ground in gardens, yards, and community spaces. I will summarize the benefits that native plants provide to birds and explore the resources we have developed to support the planting of natives, with a particular focus on the West Palm Beach area. Planting native species is something everyone can do that can have tangible benefits for birds. 

John joined Audubon in 2009 when he was hired by New York City Audubon to direct citizen science and outreach for the chapter throughout the city. In 2013, he transitioned to the National Audubon Society, first working on the Toyota TogetherGreen program before becoming Audubon’s Director of Community Conservation in 2016 and Senior Director for Bird-friendly Communities in 2019. His work at Audubon has focused on creating change in communities and engaging new audiences in Audubon’s conservation efforts, personally and through Audubon’s extensive national network. He earned his PhD in Zoology from Duke University.

A reception in Pan’s Garden will follow the lecture.

Image
John Rowden

Garden Class

Open to the Public

Reservations Required

Audubon’s bird-friendly communities conservation strategy is guided by the principle of improving communities all over the country by providing birds with food, shelter, safe passage, and places to raise their young. Native plants provide resources that support birds in each of those areas, and research is demonstrating that even small patches of habitat planted with natives – down to the yard and neighborhood scale – can benefit birds. In 2016, Audubon introduced the nationwide Plants for Birds program that provides resources and support, with the goal of helping people put native plants in the ground in gardens, yards, and community spaces. I will summarize the benefits that native plants provide to birds and explore the resources we have developed to support the planting of natives, with a particular focus on the West Palm Beach area. Planting native species is something everyone can do that can have tangible benefits for birds. 

John joined Audubon in 2009 when he was hired by New York City Audubon to direct citizen science and outreach for the chapter throughout the city. In 2013, he transitioned to the National Audubon Society, first working on the Toyota TogetherGreen program before becoming Audubon’s Director of Community Conservation in 2016 and Senior Director for Bird-friendly Communities in 2019. His work at Audubon has focused on creating change in communities and engaging new audiences in Audubon’s conservation efforts, personally and through Audubon’s extensive national network. He earned his PhD in Zoology from Duke University.

A reception in Pan’s Garden will follow the lecture.

Image
John Rowden
Category
Garden Class