Schultze and Weaver: Architects of the Resort

START DATE | TIME
Monday, January 27, 2020
10:00am
END DATE | TIME
Thursday, April 9, 2020
4:00pm
LOCATION
Event Address

311 Peruvian Avenue
Palm Beach, FL 33480
United States

Exhibition

Open Weekdays

Free to the public

The “Roaring Twenties” were an era of grand hotel construction in the United States, and no architectural firm made a bigger mark in those years than Schultze & Weaver of New York. Between 1921 and 1931, the firm designed fourteen hotels – from New York City to Havana and from Los Angeles to Palm Beach – they were among the largest and most opulent of the time, and included the Waldorf-Astoria in New York, the Breakers in Palm Beach, and the Miami Biltmore in Coral Gables.

Leonard Schultze was trained in the beaux-arts style of architecture under E.L. Masqueray before joining the New York architecture firm of Warren & Wetmore. While at Warren & Wetmore, Schultze’s commissions included: Grand Central Terminal along with the surrounding area, which was coined Terminal City; Hotelier John McEntee Bowman’s growing chain of hotels including the Biltmore and Commodore; and the Ambassador. When he met engineer, S. Fullerton Weaver through the Terminal City project the two came together to start their own firm entitled Schultze & Weaver.

Their opulent style and luxurious ideas of hospitality enabled them to become the go-to firm for hotel construction. Whether it was the modern high-rises of New York City or the rambling Mediterranean Revival style hotels of South Florida, the hotels they designed transported guests from their modern, everyday lives to the grandeur of the Old World.

The Preservation Foundation will showcase examined selections of the Schultze and Weaver Collection courtesy of The Wolfsonian.
 

Image
Schultze and Weaver

Exhibition

Open Weekdays

Free to the public

The “Roaring Twenties” were an era of grand hotel construction in the United States, and no architectural firm made a bigger mark in those years than Schultze & Weaver of New York. Between 1921 and 1931, the firm designed fourteen hotels – from New York City to Havana and from Los Angeles to Palm Beach – they were among the largest and most opulent of the time, and included the Waldorf-Astoria in New York, the Breakers in Palm Beach, and the Miami Biltmore in Coral Gables.

Leonard Schultze was trained in the beaux-arts style of architecture under E.L. Masqueray before joining the New York architecture firm of Warren & Wetmore. While at Warren & Wetmore, Schultze’s commissions included: Grand Central Terminal along with the surrounding area, which was coined Terminal City; Hotelier John McEntee Bowman’s growing chain of hotels including the Biltmore and Commodore; and the Ambassador. When he met engineer, S. Fullerton Weaver through the Terminal City project the two came together to start their own firm entitled Schultze & Weaver.

Their opulent style and luxurious ideas of hospitality enabled them to become the go-to firm for hotel construction. Whether it was the modern high-rises of New York City or the rambling Mediterranean Revival style hotels of South Florida, the hotels they designed transported guests from their modern, everyday lives to the grandeur of the Old World.

The Preservation Foundation will showcase examined selections of the Schultze and Weaver Collection courtesy of The Wolfsonian.
 

Image
Schultze and Weaver
Category
Exhibition